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Berliner Höhenweg

Berliner Höhenweg

Berliner Höhenweg

When, in the second half of the 19th century, the desire to open up the Alps to science grew increasingly strong and the newly founded, primarily academically-focused alpine associations began to build hikers' refuges and the necessary access paths, there also developed a desire to interconnect these various huts, which were frequently perched high up in the mountains. Often use was made of already available paths that had previously been travelled  by hunters and smugglers. It was on such an ancient path that "Ötzi" ultimately met his end.

In the Zillertal Alps, the Berlin chapter of the German & Austrian Alpine Association (DOeAV) was particularly active, constructing, amongst other things, the so-called "Berlin Hut" in 1879.  In 1889, a high-alpine trail was completed over the Schönbichler Horn (elev. 3,133) to the new Furtschaglhaus. Those of us today who tread across the granite slabs along this trail, many of which had to be worked by hand, can well understand the phenomenal effort that was put in by local labourers. This stage, with a total elevation gain of 1060 metres, formed the nucleus of the subsequent Berliner Höhenweg Trail.

Stages

Finkenberg (785 m) – Gamshütte (1916 m) Hikers reach the Gamshütte via the Hermann-Hecht-Weg, elev. gain 1000 m, walk-time ca. 3.5 hours

Gamshütte – Friesenberghaus (2498 m)
14 km in length, this is the longest and most challenging stage. The trail, which runs at about 2,000 metres above sea level, is exposed to the south-west, promising maximum sunlight during high summer. Little travelled. Elev. gain 1130 m, descent 561 m, walk-time ca. 9 hours

Friesenberghaus – Olpererhütte (2389 m)
Shortest stage, elev. gain 150 m, descent 250 m, walk-time ca. 1.5 hours

Olpererhütte – Furtschaglhaus (2295 m)
This stage of the trail runs alongside the Schlegeis reservoir on a road heading to the south-east in the direction of the Furtschaglboden. Descent 600 m, gain 500 m, walk-time ca. 4 hours

Furtschaglhaus – Berliner Hütte (2040 m)
At the Schönbichler Horn (elev. 3133 m) we reach the highest point of the Berliner Höhenweg. In the area of the summit, fixed cables have been installed to help with the ascent. This stage is very exposed in parts and is challenging. Gain of 900 m, descent 1060 m, walk-time ca. 7 hours

Berliner Hütte – Greizer Hütte (2226 m)
Via the Mörchenscharte (safety cables, short ladder) down to the Floitengrund then up to the Greizer Hütte. Gain 1200 m, descent 1050 m, walk-time 7 hours

Greizer Hütte – Kasseler Hütte (2177 m)
Over the Lapenscharte, down to the Lapenkar, on to the Elsenklamm gorge (safety cables) and via a rather flat trail to the Kasseler Hütte (the path over the Schuhscharte, which is still marked on many hiking maps, is no longer navigable due to a rockslide - extremely dangerous!).  Gain 500 m, descent 550 m, walk-time 6 hours.

Kasseler Hütte – Edelhütte (2237 m)
Via the Siebenschneidenweg, requiring hikers to cross 7 ridgelines, 14 km to the Edelhütte, short exposed stretches along the way requiring use of safety cables and iron pegs as footholds. Gain 600 m, descent 550 m, walk-time 9 hours

Descent to Mayrhofen
Either on the cable car (Ahornbahn lift), descent from the Edelhütte is 300 m, or on foot via the Föllenbergalpe and Gasthaus Alpenrose to Mayrhofen, total descent 1600 m

  • Berliner Höhenweg - Friensenberghaus
  • Berliner Höhenweg - Kasseler Hütte
  • Berliner Höhenweg - Berliner Hütte
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Ferienhotel Sonnenhof GmbH
Rohrerstraße 47
6280 Zell am Ziller
Zillertal, Tyrol, Austria

Tel.: +43 5282 7125
Fax: +43 5282 7125 55
info@sonnenhof.tirol

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Contact

Ferienhotel Sonnenhof GmbH
Rohrerstraße 47
6280 Zell am Ziller
Zillertal, Tyrol, Austria

Tel.: +43 5282 7125
Fax: +43 5282 7125 55
info@sonnenhof.tirol

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